Dr. Philip Henkin is a Board-Certifi ed Neurosurgeon who has been practicing in Florida for 17 years. He graduated in 1985 with a chemical engineering degree from MIT. After working as an international engineering consultant for two years, he returned to school in 1987 and graduated from Ohio State University in 1991 with an M.D. degree. He completed his post-graduate residency training at Duke University Medical Center from 1991 to 1998. He has maintained neurosurgical practice in Florida since graduating from Duke.

1. How long have you lived in the Tampa Bay area?

Seven years.

2. What is your favorite Tampa Bay restaurant?

Donatello Restaurant on Dale Mabry Highway in Tampa.

3. Where is your favorite place in Tampa Bay to relax?

Out on my boat, with a fishing pole in hand.

4. How important is it for physicians to be involved with their communities and how important is it to you personally?

It’s important. The call that we answer is to help build a better community. It’s also important that people know you outside of work. I’m involved in my daughters’ schools and their sports activities.

5. What are a few key reasons you decided to open a Private Practice?

If I were to make a top ten list, 1-9 would be being my own boss. That’s the great thing about private practice. You get to set the policies. You determine the priorities for the practice, you determine what’s important to the patient and what’s important to you. That’s important to me. It’s also the great thing about American medicine. We have more choices for healthcare than anywhere else in the world, and it’s because of the private practice model.

6. What are a few of the challenges you face while operating a Private Practice?

The challenges include the changing landscape of medicine. Every year is different from the year before. A lot of people think every year is going to be similar, but I’ve found that every year is dramatically different. It’s based on market conditions. It’s based on regulatory infl uences from the federal government. It’s infl uenced by research, by patient studies, by your own practice, whether you’re in expansion mode, adding partners, adding services. All those things add challenge.

7. How do you view the Affordable Care Act professionally and personally?

The Affordable Care Act is very destructive to American medicine, especially the provision that outlawed physician-owned hospitals. The ACA is trying to institutionalize physicians into large group practices to be able to control healthcare costs and then ultimately have hospitals control physicians. The result will be you’ll just get the standard cook book medicine and there won’t be that freedom of choice. People will have a lot fewer options for care.

8. In your opinion, what are the most important elements of a successful practice?

Quality patient outcomes. Respecting the physician-patient relationship and realizing that you have to provide signifi cant value to people is critical. Also, the ability to adapt and embrace Dr. Philip Henkin is a Board-Certifi ed Neurosurgeon who has been practicing in Florida for 17 years. He graduated in 1985 with a chemical engineering degree from MIT. After working as an international engineering consultant for two years, he returned to school in 1987 and graduated from Ohio State University in 1991 with an M.D. degree. He completed his post-graduate residency training at Duke University Medical Center from 1991 to 1998. He has maintained neurosurgical practice in Florida since graduating from Duke. new technology. It’s also important to diversify into different markets and different hospital systems and work with different providers.

9. Rising operational costs, heavier administrative burdens, new technology requirements and reimbursement models shifting from a fee-for-service to a value based payment model are a just a few of the top concerns in Private Practice. Do you feel Private Practice is slowly being pushed out or do you still vision a successful future and why?

I think right now the trend is very hostile toward private practice, but everything in medicine is cyclical. Eventually the pendulum will swing back again. People will always demand high quality care. There’s a big push toward consolidation, but all it’s going to do is decrease choice for the consumer and decrease choice for physicians, who are going to lose their autonomy.

10. Knowing Yourself: If you could go back in time and provide your younger self advice, what would it be?

I would probably choose a specialty that is less affected by the government’s infl uence and more driven by market, like plastic surgery. As plastic surgeon doesn’t necessarily rely on insurance payments or have the government limit his fees.

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